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Martin Yale 7000E 12" Commercial Stack Cutter
$767.10NewConditionInStock

Martin Yale 7000E 12" Commercial Stack Cutter

Martin Yale 7000E 12 Inch Commercial Stack Cutter Image 1

Martin Yale 7000E 12" Commercial Stack Cutter

Part #: 7000E
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ProductDescription

The Martin Yale 7000E 12" commercial stack cutter is ideal for photo shops, schools, churches, small print shops and businesses. It is capable of cutting a full 12" length or depth and a stack of 1-1/2" of 20lb paper (over 375 sheets). The Martin Yale 7000E has an adjustable paper stop and a positive clamp that holds paper in place to eliminate shifting and tearing during the cutting process. The Martin Yale 7000E also has a safety blade latch that prevents cutting until it is released. This means that two hands are required to cut paper with the Martin Yale Powerline 7000E. This is an important safety feature to help you keep your fingers safe when cutting documents.

Product Details

  • Includes all the heavy-duty features needed to cut large stacks of paper
  • Cuts a stack of paper up to 12" wide and 1 1/2" thick
  • Adjustable paper stop
  • Positive clamp holds paper in place, eliminating shifting and tearing
  • Heavy-duty wood base
  • Safety blade latch prevents cutting until released
  • Precise English and Metric rule guides
  • Dimensions: 20"w X 30"d X 16"h"
  • Weight: 45 lbs.
  • UPC Code: 11991070002
  • Warranty: 1 Year Manufacturer Warranty

ProductReviews

2 Review(s)
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Reviewed on 2/28/2016

Guillotine Review by Lauren W

This thing is heavy duty and can cut through a huge stack of paper. It works really well. However, for safety purposes we installed a chain and a lock so that students can't play around with the cutter. Would hate for someone to get a hand in there when cutting.

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Reviewed on 9/16/2015

7000E Stack Cutter Review by Lane M.

We just received this cutter, and have had the chance to use it for a few small jobs. For the price, it seems that this cutter will do the job. We will see how the quality stands up with more use. We would like to see some sort of a locking button on front of the adjustable paper guide instead of the thumb screw on the back side that is slightly incontinent. It seems that this unit will be a nice alternative to cutting one sheet at a time on our old paper trimmer.

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DemonstrationVideo

Transcript: This presentation is to demonstrate the basic operation and then setup functions of the 7000E Ream Cutter so let’s start with basic operation. First, you’re going to take about half a ream of paper, something around 250 or so sheets, and that’s about the max that you can cut in the 7000E at one time. Just slip it into the front of the machine. Adjust your back gauge to whatever measurement you want. You just want to slide your paper back there and make sure that it’s nice and square. Once your paper is nice and square, you want to lower the clamp, and the clamp doesn’t need to be exc... Read More

This presentation is to demonstrate the basic operation and then setup functions of the 7000E Ream Cutter so let’s start with basic operation. First, you’re going to take about half a ream of paper, something around 250 or so sheets, and that’s about the max that you can cut in the 7000E at one time. Just slip it into the front of the machine. Adjust your back gauge to whatever measurement you want. You just want to slide your paper back there and make sure that it’s nice and square. Once your paper is nice and square, you want to lower the clamp, and the clamp doesn’t need to be excessively tight. The clamp is just snug. That’s fine. If you’ve got a nice, sharp blade, it will cut right through the stack. Release your safety latch, bring the handle down firmly but slowly and cut all the way through the stack. And when your blade is nice and sharp, the waste should separate from the rest of the stack very clean and easy the way that you see here. If it doesn’t, there are probably a couple of different things that need to be done so let’s talk about those things. Take the paper back out of the cutter. And there’s one, two or both things that you need to do first before you do anything else. One is rotate your cutting stick. The cutting stick becomes worn over a period of time. It gets a number of grooves in it because of the blade coming down and pressing slightly into the cutting stick, which is normal. It’s supposed to do that. To remove the cutting stick, there are two retainers on the 7000E, one on either side. So as you can see, we are removing the retainer from the left side. I’m going to come around and remove the retainer from the right side. And you can just push that cutting stick in from the left side of the machine, push it out, rather, and pull it out. Hard to see there are grooves on the camera here. We’re just going to rotate it to a nice fresh side and slip it back in and then replace the retainers. And that’s how you rotate the cutting stick.

Now another potential problem that you might be having if your 7000E is not cutting through the entire stack is that you need to adjust the depth of cut, the cut on the blade. You do that by loosening the nut on the back just below the handle. So with the 5/32” Allen wrench and an open-ended socket wrench, just loosen that nut just a little bit, just enough so you can get a finger loosen. And you’re going to back that Allen screw off about an eighth of a turn and re-tighten the nut. So at this point you want to check the cut again. Cut some more paper. Make sure you’re cutting all the way through the entire stack. You want to get a nice, clean cut, but you don’t want to cut too far into that cutting stick. It should really just kind of touch the cutting stick. As you use your 7000E cutter, the blade will dull over time. Over time, you will also fail to cut through the last sheet, as I will demonstrate. Normally, you should cut through everything. I just made a full cut. We will now raise it up and, as you can see, not everything pulls away. They’re still attached. Without having to quite yet remove the blade, and it still has cutting life, we will adjust the handle stop. First, have a 5/32 hex key and a half-inch open-ended wrench. Insert your hex key into the adjustable stop screw, slightly loosen your lock nut, turn the hex key approximately 1/8 of a turn to start and then lock your jam nut once again. Take another trial cut. Do not overclamp. It requires just a slight bit of clamping. Let’s take another cut. It sounds like we got a very good, clean cut. Everything comes out cleanly. This will work for a … depends upon how much you’re cutting but this will work until you do have to replace a blade which we sharpened. To perform a blade change, you’re required to have a half inch open or closed-in wrench, a 3/16 hex key, a 5/32 hex key and a standard number two Philips. For this demonstration, I will be utilizing a 5/32 powered hex key to speed things along. To start, let’s remove the front panel or the front deck. This is required to gain access to other clamp bolts. Set this aside. Remove the top one single screw from the top cover. The cover has a small locking tab at this end so please pull the direction towards the hand wheel and the cover will come off. First, remove, or should I say, back out these three clamp screws at the bottom of the frame. Do not remove them. However, you are to unscrew them approximately half an inch. This is to allow us to gain access to the blade without removing the entire frame. When those three are complete, let us remove these two screws to the safety adjustment plate from the handle. Next, there is a small screw up here that is holding a spacer. You may want to please bring the handle down a little bit when you do this. Hold on to this spacer that’s inside so that it does not fall when you pull out the screw. There’s our spacer. Along the back, I’m going to turn this unit around. There are a total of four – there are two on one side, two on the other. I’m going to use our power driver. No need to fully remove these screws. Leave them as is but you must have them fully unthreaded from the other frame. Once that has occurred, as you see everything became loose, pull the front frame away and let it open like this. This way, you gain access to remove the handle from the blade.

At this point, please lift the handle and there is a small pin in the handle that needs to be removed from the blade. I will hold the blade over, pull the pin out of the handle. This pin is what fits into the hole in the blade. Let’s set this aside. With your unit, you received this special blade-changing wire. This is for safety reasons. The blade, even though it may be dull, will still be very, very sharp. Take the end hooked in and place it in the blade hole. Pull out the other end of the blade where the cam is riding into the guides. Be very careful when removing. When it comes out, please be careful of the cutting edge. Hold it away from you. There is a small roller that is on the blade. When changing the blades, remove this roller. When you have a new blade, lubricate both the pin and the inside of your roller and reapply. This unit will not work correctly without you reapplying the roller. Let us pretend this is the new blade that we’re putting back in. We are going to be doing everything in reverse. Please right now put your hook back in the blade. Insert that roller down between the two 45-degree cam guides and then lower the blade down to the cutting stick. Remove your wire. The blade will want to fall over, as you see. This is a benefit. As I said, when the blade falls over, you can see the exposed roller that fits in the cam slot. Make sure that that roller will be reinserting the cam slot after we have the handle reapplied to the blade. As mentioned earlier, the handle has a pin. This pin fits into the open hole in the handle. Make sure you get it started squarely and then push the side frame back in place to secure the assembly. At this time, retighten the three bottom frame bolts. When installing the safety plate, you will have to maneuver the inside until you see both screw holes. At that time, finger-tighten both screws into this. Do not tighten. We still need to have adjustments so it can still move.

After the safety plate screws have been hand installed, we must now replace the spacer between the frame halves. This also will only be finger-tightened at this time. The next one we have to do is I’m going to turn the unit around. Only these two far bolts are we going to tighten fully; these other front two still only just slightly finger-tightened at best. At this time, we’re going to reattach the front deck. The front deck has an unfinished side. Make sure that goes back against the side frame. Then go ahead and reinstall the Philips screws into the frame. We’re now going to re-level the blade.

Now, to level the blade, you need to cut five pieces of 20-pound bond paper approximately inch to inch-and-a-half wide. Stack them. Place it to the left end of the blade closest to the hand wheel. Release the safety and let the handle come down. You should be securing the paper without cutting. At this point, I will want you to push down into the right on the handle. And a good thing to try to make sure is that while these five sheets are down here and I’m pushing, you cannot get any paper under the blade. At that point, tighten your screws in the safety plate. Let’s do test cuts using your spacer strips. Cut cleanly. Another cut clean. Another cut clean. While you lead the blade down, we must now adjust the paper stock for the full cuts. Adjust your stock screw in until you make contact with the handle. At that point, back off approximately one-quarter to maybe one-half turn. Lock the jam nut again while holding your hex key. Now, let us make a test cut utilizing a stack of paper.

Transcript: Make sure your clamp is raised. Install your stack. Clamp the paper once again. No need to overclamp. One-hand clamping is all that’s required. Release the safety. Do a full cut. After cutting, see if all pulls away cleanly, which it does. Now that your blade is level, now let’s finish the assembly of your unit. Take your top cover and make note there is a small bracket on the bottom side. This bracket hooks underneath that spacer in the frame, so go ahead, install this. Drop it down. Push forward. Install your small Philips screw. When it’s finished tightening the frame screws on the ba... Read More

Make sure your clamp is raised. Install your stack. Clamp the paper once again. No need to overclamp. One-hand clamping is all that’s required. Release the safety. Do a full cut. After cutting, see if all pulls away cleanly, which it does. Now that your blade is level, now let’s finish the assembly of your unit. Take your top cover and make note there is a small bracket on the bottom side. This bracket hooks underneath that spacer in the frame, so go ahead, install this. Drop it down. Push forward. Install your small Philips screw. When it’s finished tightening the frame screws on the back side, this here, just make sure everything is tight. Now we want to perform a final test cut with this stack of paper. Go ahead with a full ream or at least something that takes up most of the area for your clamp. Clamp it. No need to overclamp. One hand and it’s clamped fine. Release your safety on your handle. Go ahead and make a full cut. Everything should pull away cleanly as you see here. Congratulations! You have successfully changed and leveled your blade, and ready to go back into production.

StaffReview

Martin Yale 7000E 12 Inch Commercial Stack Paper Cutter Review

Overview:

  • The Martin Yale 7000E is a heavy duty, table-top commercial quality paper cutter that can cut up to 1-1/2" of paper at a time.
  • This heavy duty paper cutter is ideal for small print shops and organizations that need to cut small to medium volumes of paper quickly and accurately.
  • The 7000E commercial stack cutter is ideal for photo shops, schools, churches, small print shops and professional organizations.

Features/ Strengths:

  • Although it is not a true ream cutter, the Martin Yale 7000E cutter is capable of easily cutting up to 375 sheets of 20lb paper at a time. This makes this an ideal cutter for churches and businesses that need to cut large stacks of paper for the production of flyers, brochures and sales materials.
  • The Martin Yale 7000E has a manually operated paper clamp that is designed to hold documents in place during cutting. It also has an easy to adjust paper stop to help in aligning the paper on the cutter for precise cutting. These features are extremely helpful in ensuring that documents are cut straight and true.
  • The Martin Yale 700E is an extremely sharp cutter and thus can be very dangerous if not used properly. With this in mind, Martin Yale included a blade latch that is designed to prevent cutting until the latch is released. This feature requires two hands for cutting which helps to prevent fingers from getting caught under the razor sharp blade.
  • The 7000E has a long cutting handle and a heavy wooden base. These features help to provide leverage in cutting large stacks of paper. When combined with the extremely sharp blade used by this cutter, you can slice through large stacks of paper like they are butter.

Limitations/Weaknesses:

  • The Martin Yale 7000E paper cutter is equipped with a twelve inch long cutting blade. This is ideal for cutting or trimming letter sized documents. However, the 7000E cannot trim larger documents where a cut length longer than 12" is required.
  • Although the Martin Yale 7000E uses a blade latch to help ensure safety, it is still a dangerous piece of equipment. Once the latch has been disengaged it is possible to remove your hand from the latch to complete the cutting process. This presents a potential safety issue if you are not careful. It is important to never take security for granted when using a large paper cutter such as this. Some organizations even place a lock on their cutters when they are not in use to prevent children from accidentally injuring themselves.
  • The clamping mechanism on the 7000E paper cutter is actually quite effective in holding pages in place during the cutting process. The clamp should be snug, but not excessively tight on the sheets. A snug clamp, along with a sharp blade will give you a smooth, accurate cut.
  • Like any cutter, the 7000E functions best with a sharpened blade. Some users will find a tiny bit of movement in the stack while cutting and will try to tighten the clamp more, when the real culprit is a dull blade. It's a good idea to have an extra blade and always keep a sharp one on hand. The blade changing process is a bit laborious and will take about 45 minutes.
  • The Martin Yale 7000E is an excellent high volume stack cutter. However, it is not ideal for cutting one or two sheets of paper at a time. For small volume trimming jobs it is best to use a guillotine style paper cutter or a rotary trimmer.

Recommendation:

  • The Martin Yale 7000e stack paper cutter is ideal for churches, offices and organizations that need to cut large volumes of paper at a time.
  • It offers a twelve inch cutting length, an excellent paper clamping system and a paper stop to help align the pages on the cutter.
  • As with all high capacity paper cutters, caution should be used when operating the Martin Yale 7000e. It has an extremely sharp blade that could easily cause severe injuries if the safety mechanisms are disabled or the cutter is operated without care.
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