Comparing the GBC MP2500ix and the Rhin-O-Tuff OD4012

posted this on Apr 26, 2016

There are many electric punches on the market today, but there are a relative few number of modular punches designed for the office environment. Two of the most popular choices are the MP2500ix from ACCO/GBC and the OD 4012 from Rhin-O-Tuff. Both systems feature a flat surface that is designed to stack a modular binding head for a smaller foot print as well as the advantageous vertical punching throat, allowing gravity to justify the pages. In addition, both punches have interchangeable die sets to accommodate a wide variety of punching patterns. The die sets are similar in design as well with clearly marked punching pins, a die label on the dies and a swing away pin retainer clip to keep the pins in place when the die is not in the punch. While the punches share many features, there are many differences to consider when selecting a punch.

ACCO/GBC certainly has the edge in the outward appearance of the punch as the MP2500ix has a black and stainless steel outer covering. One other feature on the MP2500ix that has been popular is that the dies are not locked into place, unlike the OD 4012 that uses 2 thumb screws to keep the die set securely in place. While this makes die change slightly faster, most offices tend to only use a single punching style and rarely change the die sets. Finally, the MP2500ix has a light to indicate when the chip tray is full and when the die is not in place.

Among the differences is the overall strength of the machines. The OD4012 makes up for its short comings in appearance with strength, durability and performance. The OD4012 is rated to punch 25 sheets per lift on the most popular binding styles, while the MP2500ix punches only 17 sheets for color coil. The additional capacity combined with a punching cycle that is a full ½ second faster per cycle makes the OD 4012 a much more productive machine for larger volume jobs.

Rhin-O-Tuff incorporated the choice of three mechanisms to activate the OD4012 compared to only two on the MP2500ix. While the GBC machine has a palm switch or a foot pedal with an air bag, the OD 4012 has offer users the choice of a foot pedal, Palm Switch or Versa Switch (paper activated). Furthermore, users can choose from 12 standard and 3 non-standard die sets while the GBC punch offers only 11 die choices. While the MP2500ix has an indicator light on the front of the machine to indicate when the chip tray is full, the OD 4012 has a large capacity U-View chip tray enabling the user to see when the tray is full.

Both punches claim to have an Anti-Jam feature, however experience shows that the MP2500ix easily jams when punching the maximum number of recommended pages or thicker stocks. The problem arises in that after the MP2500ix jams, it seems to keep jamming and the only way to clear the jammed machine is with a service call and an hour or more of service depending on the severity of the jam. The OD4012 on the other hand features an automatic Anti-Jam feature as well as a manual reverse knob. If a jam should occur, the user need only manually reverse the punch and the jam is clear. This will prevent the machine from being down and eliminate costly service calls.

After careful comparison between the two systems, it is clear to see the while ACCO/GBC put a great deal of effort into the appearance of their system and Rhin-O-Tuff put a great deal of effort into performance.

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